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Turmeric Curcumin • Improves And Protects Health In All Key Areas Of The Mind Body System • Extra-Strength Organic Anti-Inflammatory, Antioxidant and Detoxifier

$89.95 $23.95

 

Key benefits:

• Increased joint health, decreased pain and reduced arthritis symptoms

• Improved brain performance and protection against brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s

• Reduced heart disease risk and improved cardiovascular health

• Improved skin health and appearance

• Improved liver and colon health and function

• Reduced cancer risk, growth and complications

• Improved mood and reduced depression symptoms

• Improved weight management and reduced risk for metabolic syndrome

• With patented Bioperine® making Evergenics Turmeric 20x's more potent and bioavailable than other supplements†

† US Patent 5972382, bioperine.com

SKU: TURMERIC-CURC-ORGANIC-60CT-1000A Categories: ,

Organic Turmeric May Offer Your Body And Mind More Health Benefits Than Any Other Nutrient

Key benefits:

• Increased joint health, improved mobility, decreased pain and reduced arthritis symptoms

• Improved brain performance and protection against brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s

• Reduced heart disease risk and improved cardiovascular health

• Improved liver and colon health and function

• Reduced cancer risk, growth and complications

• Improved mood and reduced depression symptoms

• Improved weight management and reduced risk for metabolic syndrome

Turmeric battles inflammation, improving vital areas of health

Medical research has put chronic inflammation at the root of many of the most common and serious health problems a person can develop; these complications that can come up with little warning and at almost any age. Inflammation has been shown to contribute to and sometimes be a main cause of arthritis and joint pain, heart disease, cancer, stroke, metabolic syndrome and obesity, Alzheimer’s and other brain diseases, depression, liver disease, skin disorders and premature aging.1https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rheumatoid-arthritis/symptoms-causes/syc-20353648 2https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/playing-with-the-fire-of-inflammation 3Coussens, L M, and Z Werb. “Inflammation and Cancer.” Nature, vol. 420, no. 6917, 19 Dec. 2002, pp. 860–867. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12490959 4Paoletti, Rodolfo, and Chiara Bolego. “Metabolic Syndrome, Inflammation and Atherosclerosis.” Vascular Health and Risk Management, vol. 2, no. 2, June 2006. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1993992

Turmeric, (Curcuma longa from the ginger root family), contains a yellow compound called curcumin which is the primary, active curcuminoid of the root. Scientific research has shown that inflammation is reduced by adequate doses of curcumin, and it has become widely cited in medical publications as an effective anti-inflammatory. 5Menon, V P, and A R Sudheer. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer Nature International Publishing AG, 2007. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17569207 6Chainani-Wu, N. “Safety and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcumin: a Component of Tumeric Curcuma Longa.” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Feb. 2003, pp. 161–168., doi:107555303321223035. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12676044 7Kawamori, Toshihiko, and Ronald Lubet. “Chemopreventive Effect of Curcumin, a Naturally Occurring Anti-Inflammatory Agent, during the Promotion/Progression Stages of Colon Cancer.” Cancer Research, vol. 59, no. 3, 1 Feb. 1999, pp. 597–601. http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/59/3/597 8Satoskar, R R, and S J Shah. “Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Property of Curcumin (Diferuloyl Methane) in Patients with Postoperative Inflammation.” International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Therapy, and Toxicology, 24 Dec. 1986, pp. 651–654. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3546166 9Aggarwal, Bharat, and Kuzhuvelil B Harikumar. “Potential Therapeutic Effects of Curcumin, the Anti-Inflammatory Agent, against Neurodegenerative, Cardiovascular, Pulmonary, Metabolic, Autoimmune and Neoplastic Diseases.” The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology, vol. 41, no. 1, Jan. 2009, pp. 40–59. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1357272508002550 10Goel, Ajay, et al. “Specific Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) Expression by Dietary Curcumin in HT-29 Human Colon Cancer Cells.” Cancer Letters, vol. 172, no. 2, 30 Oct. 2001, pp. 111–118. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304383501006553

Turmeric is one of the most powerful whole food antioxidants you can buy to improve and protect your health

Antioxidants prevent cellular damage caused by oxidative stress, a condition in the body stemming from an overabundance of unstable molecules called free radicals or reactive oxygen species.11Bayani, Uttara, et al. “Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Review of Upstream and Downstream Antioxidant Therapeutic Options.” Current Neuropharmacology, vol. 7, no. 1, Mar. 2009, pp. 65–74., doi:10.2174/157015909787602823. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2724665/ 12Lobo, V, et al. “Free Radicals, Antioxidants and Functional Foods: Impact on Human Health.” Pharmacognosy Reviews, vol. 4, no. 8, 2010, p. 118., doi:10.4103/0973-7847.70902. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3249911/ 13Young, I S, and J Woodside. “Antioxidants in Health and Disease.” Journal of Clinical Pathology, vol. 54, no. 3, Mar. 2001, pp. 176–186. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11253127

Research has linked free radical overactivity and oxidative stress to many serious health problems including cancer, diabetes, obesity, arthritis, macular degeneration, cataracts, kidney disease, heart disease, chronic inflammation, atherosclerosis (build up of fatty deposits that clog ateries), Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, stroke and premature aging.14Lovell, M, et al. “Elevated Thiobarbituric Acid-Reactive Substances and Antioxidant Enzyme Activity in the Brain in Alzheimer’s Disease.” Neurology, vol. 45, no. 8, Aug. 1995, pp. 1594–1601. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7644059 15Fridovich, I. “Fundamental Aspects of Reactive Oxygen Species, or What’s the Matter with Oxygen?” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1999. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10672226/ 16Knight, J A. “Diseases Related to Oxygen-Derived Free Radicals.” Annals of Clinical & Laboratory Science, vol. 25, no. 2, 1995, pp. 111–121. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7785961 17Ozbek, Emin. “Induction of Oxidative Stress in Kidney.” International Journal of Nephrology, vol. 2012, 2012, pp. 1–9., doi:10.1155/2012/465897. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/ijn/2012/465897/ 18Bayani, Uttara, et al. “Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Review of Upstream and Downstream Antioxidant Therapeutic Options.” Current Neuropharmacology, vol. 7, no. 1, Mar. 2009, pp. 65–74., doi:10.2174/157015909787602823. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2724665/ 19Baynes, J W. “Role of Oxidative Stress in Development of Complications in Diabetes.” Diabetes, vol. 40, no. 4, Apr. 1991, pp. 405–412. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2010041

Free radicals are the natural by-product of normal human activities like exercise, digestion and breathing, but when free radical production exceeds the countermeasures of antioxidants, health problems from cellular damage start to occur.

Scientific research has shown that many environmental factors can accelerate free radical overproduction including exposure to toxins and particulate matter pollutants that are all around us and almost impossible to entirely avoid like sulfur dioxide (from the combustion of fossil fuels by power plants, industrial facilities, locomotives and airplanes), automobile exhaust, low-atmosphere ozone created by smog, nitrogen dioxide (from gas appliances), acid rain, cigarette smoke and radiation. 20Dellinger, B, et al. “Role of Free Radicals in the Toxicity of Airborne Fine Particulate Matter.” Chemical Research in Toxicology, vol. 14, no. 10, Oct. 2001, pp. 1371–1377. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11599928 21Mohankumar, Sheba M.j., et al. “Particulate Matter, Oxidative Stress and Neurotoxicity.” NeuroToxicology, vol. 29, no. 3, 2008, pp. 479–488., doi:10.1016/j.neuro.2007.12.004. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18289684 22https://www.cdc.gov/air/particulate_matter.html 23Lodovici, Maura, and Elisabetta Bigagli. “Oxidative Stress and Air Pollution Exposure.” Journal of Toxicology, vol. 2011, 2011, pp. 1–9., doi:10.1155/2011/487074. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jt/2011/487074/#B3 24Lawal, Akeem O. “Air Particulate Matter Induced Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Cardiovascular Disease and Atherosclerosis: The Role of Nrf2 and AhR-Mediated Pathways.” Toxicology Letters, vol. 270, 2017, pp. 88–95., doi:10.1016/j.toxlet.2017.01.017. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28189649 25Mirowsky, Jaime E., et al. “Differential Expression of pro-Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Mediators Induced by Nitrogen Dioxide and Ozone in Primary Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells.” Inhalation Toxicology, vol. 28, no. 8, 2016, pp. 374–382., doi:10.1080/08958378.2016.1185199. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27206323

Other causes of free radical production and oxidative stress in the body are common household cleaners for kitchens, bathrooms and windows that contain ammonia. 26Ramarao, K, et al. “Role of Oxidative Stress in the Ammonia-Induced Mitochondrial Permeability Transition in Cultured Astrocytes.” Neurochemistry International, vol. 47, no. 1-2, 2005, pp. 31–38., doi:10.1016/j.neuint.2005.04.004. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15908047 Ammonia is also found in fertilizers and pesticides.

Consuming alcoholic beverages, sugary drinks and fried foods can increase excess free radical production and cellular damage.27Wu, D, and A Cederbaum. “Alcohol, Oxidative Stress, and Free Radical Damage.” National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, https://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh27-4/277-284.htm. 28Baker, L. “Study Shows Glucose Consumption Increases Production of Destructive Free Radicals, Lowers Level of Key Antioxidant.” University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, 16 Aug. 2000, http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2000/08/4839.html. 29“Oxidized Cholesterol & Vegetable Oils Identified as the Main Cause of Heart Disease.” University Health News, 11 Jan. 2018, https://universityhealthnews.com/daily/heart-health/oxidized-cholesterol-vegetable-oils-identified-as-the-main-cause-of-heart-disease/. 30Dobarganes, M. “Formation of New Compounds during Frying.” AOCS Lipid Library, The American Oil Chemists’ Society, lipidlibrary.aocs.org/OilsFats/content.cfm?ItemNumber=39209. 31Sharma, H. Consumer Health, 1995, www.consumerhealth.org/articles/display.cfm?ID=19990303172533. 32Heart and Vascular Team. “7 Things You Should Know About Cooking With Oil.” Health Essentials, Cleveland Clinic, 16 Sept. 2016, health.clevelandclinic.org/2014/06/7-things-you-should-know-about-cooking-with-oils. 33Boskou, Dimitrios. Frying of Food: Oxidation, Nutrient and Non-Nutrient Antioxidants, Biologically Active Compounds, and High Temperatures. CRC, 2011. 34Donnelly, J, and D Robinson. “Free Radicals in Foods.” Free Radical Research, vol. 22, no. 2, Feb. 1995, pp. 147–176. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7704185.

Whole food antioxidants, like curcumin naturally derived from organic turmeric, are considered the ideal source for protection against free radical overproduction and oxidative stress. A wide range of scientific research shows that curcumin is an effective and safe antioxidant to consume for the protection of your health and wellness. 35Bosca, A. Ramirez, et al. “Effects of the Antioxidant Turmeric on Lipoprotein Peroxides: Implications for the Prevention of Atherosclerosis.” Age, vol. 20, no. 3, 1997, pp. 165–168., doi:10.1007/s11357-997-0015-z. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3455890. 36Ak, Tuba, and Ilhami Gulcin. “Antioxidant and Radical Scavenging Properties of Curcumin.”Chemico-Biological Interactions, vol. 174, no. 1, 2008, pp. 27–37., doi:10.1016/j.cbi.2008.05.003. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18547552.

Everything You Want From Your Turmeric and Nothing You Don’t

Because Evergenics Turmeric Curcumin is organic you can feel confident your supplement is 100% pure, natural and free of synthetic additives like pesticides, chemical fertilizers, dyes or any artificial ingredients whatsoever. Like all Evergenics supplements, Turmeric Curcumin is produced in the USA in an FDA registered facility adhering strictly to USA GMPs (good manufacturing practices) and, in keeping with the highest organic standards, Evergenics Turmeric Curcumin is processed without the use of industrial solvents, irradiation or genetic engineering.

Evergenics Turmeric Curcumin is many times more concentrated and beneficial than the turmeric you find in the spice aisle, and the addition of patented Bioperine®, a special form of pepper, makes our turmeric 20x’s more absorbable than other supplements. 37https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9619120 38bioperine.com 39U.S. Patent 5,972,382 This means you get more than twice the health benefits per serving and more than twice the value when you choose Evergenics premium Turmeric Curcumin capsules. Our formula, standardized to 95% curcuminoids, gives you the maximum safe dose of 1400mg per serving.

We encourage you to start enjoying all of the life-changing benefits turmeric has to offer by trying a bottle of Evergenics Turmeric Curcumin today, risk-free! If at anytime you are not completely loving the health results your are receiving, simply contact us by email or phone for a prompt, hassle-free refund!

References   [ + ]

1. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rheumatoid-arthritis/symptoms-causes/syc-20353648
2. https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/playing-with-the-fire-of-inflammation
3. Coussens, L M, and Z Werb. “Inflammation and Cancer.” Nature, vol. 420, no. 6917, 19 Dec. 2002, pp. 860–867. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12490959
4. Paoletti, Rodolfo, and Chiara Bolego. “Metabolic Syndrome, Inflammation and Atherosclerosis.” Vascular Health and Risk Management, vol. 2, no. 2, June 2006. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1993992
5. Menon, V P, and A R Sudheer. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer Nature International Publishing AG, 2007. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17569207
6. Chainani-Wu, N. “Safety and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcumin: a Component of Tumeric Curcuma Longa.” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Feb. 2003, pp. 161–168., doi:107555303321223035. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12676044
7. Kawamori, Toshihiko, and Ronald Lubet. “Chemopreventive Effect of Curcumin, a Naturally Occurring Anti-Inflammatory Agent, during the Promotion/Progression Stages of Colon Cancer.” Cancer Research, vol. 59, no. 3, 1 Feb. 1999, pp. 597–601. http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/59/3/597
8. Satoskar, R R, and S J Shah. “Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Property of Curcumin (Diferuloyl Methane) in Patients with Postoperative Inflammation.” International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Therapy, and Toxicology, 24 Dec. 1986, pp. 651–654. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3546166
9. Aggarwal, Bharat, and Kuzhuvelil B Harikumar. “Potential Therapeutic Effects of Curcumin, the Anti-Inflammatory Agent, against Neurodegenerative, Cardiovascular, Pulmonary, Metabolic, Autoimmune and Neoplastic Diseases.” The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology, vol. 41, no. 1, Jan. 2009, pp. 40–59. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1357272508002550
10. Goel, Ajay, et al. “Specific Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) Expression by Dietary Curcumin in HT-29 Human Colon Cancer Cells.” Cancer Letters, vol. 172, no. 2, 30 Oct. 2001, pp. 111–118. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304383501006553
11, 18. Bayani, Uttara, et al. “Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Review of Upstream and Downstream Antioxidant Therapeutic Options.” Current Neuropharmacology, vol. 7, no. 1, Mar. 2009, pp. 65–74., doi:10.2174/157015909787602823. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2724665/
12. Lobo, V, et al. “Free Radicals, Antioxidants and Functional Foods: Impact on Human Health.” Pharmacognosy Reviews, vol. 4, no. 8, 2010, p. 118., doi:10.4103/0973-7847.70902. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3249911/
13. Young, I S, and J Woodside. “Antioxidants in Health and Disease.” Journal of Clinical Pathology, vol. 54, no. 3, Mar. 2001, pp. 176–186. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11253127
14. Lovell, M, et al. “Elevated Thiobarbituric Acid-Reactive Substances and Antioxidant Enzyme Activity in the Brain in Alzheimer’s Disease.” Neurology, vol. 45, no. 8, Aug. 1995, pp. 1594–1601. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7644059
15. Fridovich, I. “Fundamental Aspects of Reactive Oxygen Species, or What’s the Matter with Oxygen?” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1999. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10672226/
16. Knight, J A. “Diseases Related to Oxygen-Derived Free Radicals.” Annals of Clinical & Laboratory Science, vol. 25, no. 2, 1995, pp. 111–121. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7785961
17. Ozbek, Emin. “Induction of Oxidative Stress in Kidney.” International Journal of Nephrology, vol. 2012, 2012, pp. 1–9., doi:10.1155/2012/465897. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/ijn/2012/465897/
19. Baynes, J W. “Role of Oxidative Stress in Development of Complications in Diabetes.” Diabetes, vol. 40, no. 4, Apr. 1991, pp. 405–412. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2010041
20. Dellinger, B, et al. “Role of Free Radicals in the Toxicity of Airborne Fine Particulate Matter.” Chemical Research in Toxicology, vol. 14, no. 10, Oct. 2001, pp. 1371–1377. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11599928
21. Mohankumar, Sheba M.j., et al. “Particulate Matter, Oxidative Stress and Neurotoxicity.” NeuroToxicology, vol. 29, no. 3, 2008, pp. 479–488., doi:10.1016/j.neuro.2007.12.004. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18289684
22. https://www.cdc.gov/air/particulate_matter.html
23. Lodovici, Maura, and Elisabetta Bigagli. “Oxidative Stress and Air Pollution Exposure.” Journal of Toxicology, vol. 2011, 2011, pp. 1–9., doi:10.1155/2011/487074. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jt/2011/487074/#B3
24. Lawal, Akeem O. “Air Particulate Matter Induced Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Cardiovascular Disease and Atherosclerosis: The Role of Nrf2 and AhR-Mediated Pathways.” Toxicology Letters, vol. 270, 2017, pp. 88–95., doi:10.1016/j.toxlet.2017.01.017. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28189649
25. Mirowsky, Jaime E., et al. “Differential Expression of pro-Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Mediators Induced by Nitrogen Dioxide and Ozone in Primary Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells.” Inhalation Toxicology, vol. 28, no. 8, 2016, pp. 374–382., doi:10.1080/08958378.2016.1185199. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27206323
26. Ramarao, K, et al. “Role of Oxidative Stress in the Ammonia-Induced Mitochondrial Permeability Transition in Cultured Astrocytes.” Neurochemistry International, vol. 47, no. 1-2, 2005, pp. 31–38., doi:10.1016/j.neuint.2005.04.004. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15908047
27. Wu, D, and A Cederbaum. “Alcohol, Oxidative Stress, and Free Radical Damage.” National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, https://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh27-4/277-284.htm.
28. Baker, L. “Study Shows Glucose Consumption Increases Production of Destructive Free Radicals, Lowers Level of Key Antioxidant.” University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, 16 Aug. 2000, http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2000/08/4839.html.
29. “Oxidized Cholesterol & Vegetable Oils Identified as the Main Cause of Heart Disease.” University Health News, 11 Jan. 2018, https://universityhealthnews.com/daily/heart-health/oxidized-cholesterol-vegetable-oils-identified-as-the-main-cause-of-heart-disease/.
30. Dobarganes, M. “Formation of New Compounds during Frying.” AOCS Lipid Library, The American Oil Chemists’ Society, lipidlibrary.aocs.org/OilsFats/content.cfm?ItemNumber=39209.
31. Sharma, H. Consumer Health, 1995, www.consumerhealth.org/articles/display.cfm?ID=19990303172533.
32. Heart and Vascular Team. “7 Things You Should Know About Cooking With Oil.” Health Essentials, Cleveland Clinic, 16 Sept. 2016, health.clevelandclinic.org/2014/06/7-things-you-should-know-about-cooking-with-oils.
33. Boskou, Dimitrios. Frying of Food: Oxidation, Nutrient and Non-Nutrient Antioxidants, Biologically Active Compounds, and High Temperatures. CRC, 2011.
34. Donnelly, J, and D Robinson. “Free Radicals in Foods.” Free Radical Research, vol. 22, no. 2, Feb. 1995, pp. 147–176. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7704185.
35. Bosca, A. Ramirez, et al. “Effects of the Antioxidant Turmeric on Lipoprotein Peroxides: Implications for the Prevention of Atherosclerosis.” Age, vol. 20, no. 3, 1997, pp. 165–168., doi:10.1007/s11357-997-0015-z. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3455890.
36. Ak, Tuba, and Ilhami Gulcin. “Antioxidant and Radical Scavenging Properties of Curcumin.”Chemico-Biological Interactions, vol. 174, no. 1, 2008, pp. 27–37., doi:10.1016/j.cbi.2008.05.003. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18547552.
37. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9619120
38. bioperine.com
39. U.S. Patent 5,972,382